Read of the Week #88

From the week just gone, two topics have dominated my reading: politics in Britain, the Windrush scandal which intersects with Brexit so clearly for me, and the Referendum on May 25th on the removal/retention of the 8th Amendment to the Irish Constitution. Two reads each on those two dominate my choices there, I’m making no excuses for nailing my colours to the mast (both Brexit and the 8th Amendment were/are poor outcomes of public discourse). I’ve broken this post up with some humour and History, when political dust settles we should always have time to laugh and understand our History.

I’ve included the work of Donald McRae here before, and this piece from the Guardian combines several of my passions. An interview with Jürgen Klopp is always welcome reading for a Liverpool fan, but here Donald directs him into talking about Brexit, German politics and much else as only an expert journalist can. And this was before last week’s classic against Roma!

Taking that discussion a step further I was glad to find Kimiko de Freytas ‘harped my fear aright’ in this piece on the Windrush Scandal. The way the British government has treated it’s own citizens from the Commonwealth (or Empire as some would prefer it, I think) in an effort to scapegoat all immigrants does not augur well for the post-Brexit Britain.

Now for a moment of light relief. I’ve often turned to Patrick Freyne to make me laugh out loud in a room all by myself (the gold standard of excellent humour writing). Here he’s describing Francis Brennan, tv personality, though none of us really know know how or why, even Francis himself I think.

I’m picking two of the clearest pieces I’ve read on the Referendum. Both moved me to tears, both have I believe the ring of truth that comes from a position of authority. Chris Fitzpatrick is an obstetrician and gynaecologist, former Master of the Coombe and a university Professor. He warns of the danger of oversimplifying this so complicated issue, and urges the reader to think of the woman in the emergency room and the woman on her way to London. The second is by Caroline McCarthy who makes the clear case that providing the opportunity to chose is the best thing a Republic can do for its citizens. I’m voting Yes for the reason both Chris and Caroline so clearly outline. I’m voting Yes, decisions about so complex and at the same time human issues do not belong in as unyielding a document as a Constitution, but in laws set by our parliament.

Podcast of the Week sends us back to In Ireland in the revolutionary period. This History Ireland discussion on cinema as the newest mass media of the time is fascinating.

Finally, this potrait of Dora Maar by Pablo Picasso is the image of the week. I found it here.

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Reads of the Week #82

After a week off, I had so much to chose from since #81. I don’t know what the choice each week says about me or my current state but this week I picked a piece on the misuse of History, on a movie from the  1960s about an uncertain future, one about a war that might or might not be over, a piece on a horror movie based on a classic novel by an Irishman, another the New York subway in all it’s crumbling glory, something lovely about a father, something deep about Shakespeare and a black flower.

Gary Younge on how History is stolen, distorted and resold to us.

Bruce Handy goes into fantastic detail on the making of 2001: A Space Odyssey (note colon).

Liam Stack on the ‘Forgotten’ Conflict That Shaped the Modern World, the Korean War.

From Come Here to Me Dublin, Florence Balcombe, widow of Bram Stoker, and the war for Nosferatu.

On the In Our Time podcast, Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss Shakespeare’s best known, most quoted and longest play, Hamlet. Did it for my Leaving (first time) and taught it with relish so many times.

And the cover image is Black Pansy (detail), from Georgia O’Keeffe, from 1926 I found through #WOMENSART.

Reads of the Week #79

A mixed choice this week, covering history (as usual), film, maths history, pencils, James Joyce and Paul Gauguin. Nothing if not eclectic me, if more people read this, one of them might be able to tell me what the trends in my choices are. If…

How the Holocaust Haunts Eastern Europe by Lev Golinkin is a fascinating History of commemoration and non-commemoration.

I saw Three Billboards a few weeks back and it’s awfulness stayed with me. I couldn’t find the right words for it though until I read Wesley Morris in the New York Times here.

These four tips for department meetings from Greg Ashman are right up my street, good planning meetings need clarity and reading ahead.

This short piece by Sarah Laskov on how dots turned into zeros is fascinating in a maths crosses over with history way.

Inside One of America’s Last Pencil Factories, pictures by Chris Payne and Sam Anderson. This is a real treat.

Podcast of the Week: Melvyn Bragg and his guests discuss James Joyce’s novel Ulysses on In Our Time. No further explanation necessary!

Image of the Week in The Siesta by Paul Gauguin came from here.

Reads of the Week #77

Christmas has come and gone, the reading goes on. This is a selection of the best things I read over the break, so it’s slightly longer than usual. Switching off the phone over Christmas for three days might not sound like a revolutionary act, but for me that’s extraordinary! So there’s plenty of interesting stuff still in the bank to share in the weeks to come.

 

First here’s a story about a basketball coach who can’t quit from Adam Zagoria. It struck a chord with me: teachers who have to suddenly stop on retirement must find themselves in a strange limbo sometimes.

 

This next piece is raw, honest and tragic. Mimi O’Donnell writes on the loss of her partner Philip Seymour Hoffman.

 

This piece by Jen Gann about her son is moving and frank while dealing with some of the issues the debate around the 8th Amendment will bring up in Ireland will bring up.

 

For a bit of fun head over to Instagram  to see Accidentally Wes Anderson which does the job of location spotter quite well for the next Anderson movie.

 

I loved this piece by Theo Dorgan about the place he came from. Home is so important, and so is remembering where we came from

 

Most of the education reading I did over Christmas I chose to challenge me. This post by Katie Martin did just that on collaboration and teachers supporting each other.

If we want to improve skills and knowledge and the application of them in our classrooms, we must move beyond telling people what to do and get into classrooms to help them problem solve, reflect, tweak, and learn together and collectively figure out how to move forward.
Improving our practice is always worth it.

 

This is just a beautiful essay on the triggers that set us off remembering someone who’s gone from Roy Hoffman. A Sister’s Nurturing, in Countless Home Haircuts

 

Two podcasts now, the first is on Suffragism from In our Time. Very apt for the year that we are entering because (some, not all) British, and, by association Irish women were given the franchise in 1918. Consistently brilliant programmes from the BBC here, by the way.

And the second is on the sounds our computers make  from Twenty Thousand Hertz. A fascinating look into what the noises our devices are making, where they came from and who designed them.

 

The cover image this week is one of my favourite pictures: Hunters in the Snow (Winter) by Pieter Bruegel the Elder which we were lucky enough to see about fourteen years ago in Vienna. I used it in school all the time. Some great conversations began there. I got it from the very cool Google Arts and Culture.

Reads of the Week #63

I was very busy this week, a lot of driving, and not as much time for reading. So, luckily, a small few wonderful pieces of writing came my way.

First the least devastating, but no less moving, no less thoughtprovoking, Mosi Secret traces the lives of the first black boys to integrate the elite prep schools of the American South. Their struggles then and since are both a testament to their bravery and perseverance. (Keeping an eye Longreads always pays off.)

Now this piece by Sally-Ann Rowland on having, or not having, a baby tore me up. The honesty is so refreshing, the story is so heartbreaking, but such a rewarding read.

Kevin Toolis, like the previous piece found in the Guardian, writes about the death and wake of his father. It is so familiar to us Irish, but again here, the honest openness with which he writies is just beautiful.

‘I Saw Beckett The Other Day’ and other poems by Orfhlaith Foyle are just right to make you think and lift you up. I got them from Poethead curated by Chris Murray.

I have an amazing podcast for you to listen to this week: first Jarlath Regan spoke to JP and Brendan Byrne about their book “Don’t Hug Your Mother” and parental alienation when families fall apart. Two amazing men.

And finally, this weeks cover image is of Nastassja Kinski and the recently late, but always great Harry Dean Stanton in Paris Texas. One Perfect Shot is the source.