Reads of the Week #41

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Reads this week from Dublin, Baltimore, boxing, the web and the workplace battleground…
From Alan Kinsella here’s an inside view of Croke Park.

In this interview Peter Fleming discusses neoliberalism’s war on workers.
Kate Crane wants to know: what happened to her father Eddy?

Roddy Doyle on Paris under attack.
Lydia Monin writes on Dan Donnelly, Irish boxer, scourge of English fighters.

And finally, Tech is raising our kids, so what? asks Alex Balk

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Reads of the Week #39

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Some heavy hitters here in a good week of reading, mainly because it was midterm and there was time for reading. Time for reading is golden.

James Snell asks though the literary and the historical can co-exist, should they? Should the writers of history make conscious decisions about their work on the basis of little more than style? I would humbly suggest that the answer to both of those questions is yes – and that the writing of history would be greatly improved – both in quality and reach – if more people thought so too. 

Writing history with skill and verve is not a distasteful exercise.

Terry Eagleton writes: As professors are transformed into managers, so students are converted into consumers. Universities fall over one another in an undignified scramble to secure their fees. Once such customers are safely within the gates, there is pressure on their professors not to fail them, and thus risk losing their fees. The general idea is that if the student fails, it is the professor’s fault, rather like a hospital in which every death is laid at the door of the medical staff.

Universities are service stations for neocapitalism.

Reviewing When the Facts Change: Essays by Tony Judt, Nicholas Lezard writes There are one or two big things, however, that the historian Tony Judt changed his mind about, and in this superb collection of essays, which consists mainly of substantial reviews from the New York and London Reviews of Books, we can track at least one of them.

A penetrating eye for realpolitik.

Kate Harding says being kidnapped by a pedophile: it’s basically like summer camp that never ends, if you ask Bill O’Reilly.

Everything Fox News gets horribly wrong about rape culture.


Malcolm Gladwell writes The problem is not that there is an endless supply of deeply disturbed young men who are willing to contemplate horrific acts. It’s worse. It’s that young men no longer need to be deeply disturbed to contemplate horrific acts.

How School Shootings Spread.

To text or not to text… that was never the question. But what if Hamlet or Jane Eyre had got their hands on a mobile phone? Mallory Ortberg introduces her series of literary masterpieces reimagined for the 21st century, Mallory Ortberg in the Guardian.

Literary classics in text messages.

Read of the Week #38

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This week: 

The archive of all previous posts is here

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Reads of the Week #33

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First this week the story of the man who takes care of Kermit since Jim Henson died, interesting, informative and touching. 

Next, here’s Laura June on her small daughter and technology, they copy everything we do.

Here’s Jay Rayner’s review of restaurant Smith & Wollensky, he doesn’t like it much. 

On politics this is fascinating: Nordic Social Democratic politics and Olof Palme.

And finally the unsettling tale of the sex and lies one woman endured to survive the Holocaust.

Here are the tweets of every read so far, 160 and counting. 

This is the archive of all the reads so far. 

Reads of the Week #32

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This week: 

why your book is not your baby;

why you should never trust a movie poster;

why times of austerity breed the growth of education fallacies;

what luck means in education;

why Taylor Swift was here before;

why teachers should be allowed to teach;

and what happens when you walk with human beings seeking refuge (video). 
Here are the tweets of the 160 articles so far.

Here’s the archive of all the blogposts

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Reads of the Week #30

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In this belated post I’ve got things to read on enabling children to think by Greg Ashman, 10 things NQTs need their colleagues to know from George Couros, Sorcha Pollak on the knock on effect of being undocumented and in an irish school and a great piece on John Cheever’€™s “The Swimmer”

Here are all the tweets of over 150 articles

This is the archive of all the blogposts so far

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Top 12 headlines in Irish education this summer

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Here’s the news in Irish education:

Schools are for drilling

Points are for counting

The Leaving Cert is a fix

Maths was too easy, but now it’s too hard

Everyone’s an entrepreneur 

Change is a bad thing

Education is a means to an end

Teachers are disposable

Teachers are on the gravy train

Embarrassing the Minister is the only way to get to college

Schools are churches 

Schools aren’t churches
Those are the headlines, have a happy return to school…